H-E-B employees test positive for coronavirus

H-E-B in Brownsville reported three new cases among staff this week. As both employee and public cases continue to rise, petitions have circulated online...

In wake of COVID-19 surge, Hidalgo County limits mass gatherings to 10 or less

Hidalgo County Judge Richard F. Cortez signed an order Thursday limiting mass gatherings in the county to 10 people or less and implementing a curfew in response to a dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases. The order goes into effect immediately and will remain effective until modified, a news release from the county said. The new curfew is set from 10 p.m.  to  6 a.m. for minors and from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. for residents who are 18 and older. Read the full story at themonitor.com

In wake of COVID-19 surge, Hidalgo County limits mass gatherings to 10 or less

Hidalgo County Judge Richard F. Cortez signed an order Thursday limiting mass gatherings in the county to 10 people or less and implementing a curfew in response to a dramatic increase in COVID-19 cases. The order goes into effect immediately and will remain effective until modified, a news release from the county said. The new curfew is set from 10 p.m.  to  6 a.m. for minors and from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. for residents who are 18 and older. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Valley’s COVID-19 cases explode by 570

The Rio Grande Valley saw a record increase in COVID-19 cases Wednesday as new positives across four counties raised the tally to 570. Hidalgo County confirmed Wednesday afternoon that four more residents died from complications of COVID-19 and 373 more cases have been confirmed, bringing the total number of fatalities to 29 and cases to 2,503. The new fatalities and confirmed cases represent record numbers for the county. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Appeals court rules in favor of fast-track deportations

An appellate court ruled Tuesday that a lawsuit filed against the Trump administration seeking to end “fast-track” deportations without legal process can continue, but also overturned an earlier injunction that barred the administration from doing so, court records show. Last August, the American Civil Liberties Union together with La Unión del Pueblo Entero, a local immigrant-advocacy group based in San Juan, the American Immigration Council and Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP filed a federal lawsuit in Washington on behalf of immigrant community organizations Make the Road New York, and We Count! Read the full story at themonitor.com

Brownsville Post Office employees test positive for COVID-19

The U.S. Postal Service on Wednesday confirmed that several of its employees at the Brownsville Post office have tested positive for COVID-19. “This has been...

Hundreds showing up at coronavirus testing sites

Cameron County officials on Monday reported over 100 new coronavirus cases, bringing the county’s total positives to 1,647. Of that figure 1,002 of those...

County reviewing virus options; Rising cases may prompt more mandates

Cameron County Judge Eddie Treviño Jr. said the county’s legal department is reviewing other ways the county might implement and enforce additional mandates to...

Like wildfire: Masks again vital to stemming virus spread

Cameron County is on course to run out of hospital bed capacity for COVID-19 patients if everyone doesn’t start doing their part now to...

Texas lawmakers call on ICE to release migrants in immigration detention centers

By Stacy Fernández, Texas Tribune U.S. Reps. Joaquin Castro, D-San Antonio, and Sylvia Garcia, D-Houston, called on Immigration and Customs Enforcement on Monday to release...

DACA recipients breathe sigh of relief … for now

More than 700,000 people can breathe a little easier after the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was illegally rescinded and must remain in place for now. In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that the Trump administration violated the Administrative Procedures Act when it “arbitrarily and capriciously” rescinded the DACA program in September 2017 for more than 700,000 recipients across the country, and an estimated nearly 30,000 recipients in the Rio Grande Valley. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Mercedes, former city attorney locked in legal battle

The city of Mercedes has embroiled itself in a bitter legal battle with a man who once served as its chief legal counsel, lobbing multiple allegations against the man in a trio of lawsuits, including attorney malpractice, fraud and breach of contract. The city filed the three suits in recent months against Juan R. Molina, who served as Mercedes’ city attorney for 14 years until his resignation in January 2019. Molina has fired back, calling the litigation “a political witch hunt, and an attempt to burn at the stake (Mercedes’) perceived enemies.” The attorney also claims the suits are an attempt by the city to commit a fraud of its own in relation to two plots of land it sold in 2011 and 2012. However, Molina isn’t the only defendant being sued by the Queen City. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Edinburg police arrest trio suspected of theft of mail

Edinburg police arrested a trio of suspects they say were driving around in late May while looking for packages to steal. The investigation began after a man called police on May 27 to report that a package containing an Apple Macbook Pro that was delivered to his house was missing. He reviewed his security footage, which showed a woman exiting a Chevy Spark before taking the package from his front door, according to a probable cause affidavit. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

State health officials identify local COVID-19 hot spots

Health officials monitoring the number of COVID-19 cases locally identified Hidalgo County and South Padre Island, specifically, as coronavirus hot spots following the large...

More nursing homes report outbreaks, take necessary steps

HARLINGEN — More nursing homes are reporting coronavirus outbreaks despite Texas programs aimed at protecting patients described as the state’s “most vulnerable population.” Cameron County...

Trump administration extends visa ban to non-immigrants

By DEB RIECHMANN and ELLIOT SPAGAT Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said Monday that it was extending a ban on green cards...

Safety measures: Schools take strict precautions this summer

HARLINGEN — Safety at every turn. Before a student even leaves the vehicle for a class this summer, a Harlingen school district employee checks his...

Diocese ordains new priests to Valley churches

SAN JUAN— Three men entered the Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle-National Shrine here as transitional deacons; they left as priests. The...

Cameron, Starr counties report 198 new virus cases

Cameron County reported 92 new cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, county Judge Eddie Trevino Jr. announced in a news release. The new cases are from...

McAllen gauges lasting effects of border commerce losses

A billion dollar a year industry here has dried up because of the pandemic and according to local officials, if things don’t change soon it may never come back. McAllen Mayor Jim Darling said the city has seen its sales tax revenues drop nearly six times as much as other Rio Grande Valley cities during the pandemic, a phenomenon he attributes to the city’s reliance on international shoppers from Mexico. Those shoppers have been barred from crossing the border to spend money in the city since March 21. Last week, the Department of Homeland Security extended the closure to nonessential travel through July 21. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Busy waters: Virus-linked downturn has little effect on port

HARLINGEN — The business downturn associated with coronavirus lockdowns and shelter-at-home mandates has spared the Port of Harlingen. Port officials say the activity of personnel...

Asylum seekers await fate amid virus

Dark clouds rolled into Brownsville early Friday afternoon bringing lightning, thunder, and pouring rain to downtown and across the river where an estimated 2,500...

Report: CBP struggled to meet detention standards for migrants

During the influx of migrant families to the U.S.-Mexico border last year, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials failed to meet certain detention standards for those in their care. According to a recently published report from the Office of the Inspector General, the largest inspector general’s office in the federal government tasked with combating fraud, waste and abuse, and to improve the efficiency of Health and Human Services programs, CBP facilities “struggled” to meet detention standards for migrants in their care during the months of May and June 2019. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Polls suggest Biden has a shot at winning Texas

By Abby Livingston and Alex Samuels, Texas Tribune No matter how frequently it happens, it’s always a bit startling. Ever since February 2019, polls have been...

3 City of Brownsville workers test positive for coronavirus

The City of Brownsville says three employees tested positive for coronavirus on Wednesday. The three work with the Brownsville Police Department as non-police, Fire Department Administration...

Cameron County judge orders mask mandate

Cameron County Judge Eddie Treviño Jr. on Wednesday signed an order mandating that all businesses in the county require customers and employees to wear...

Cameron joins Hidalgo County in mandating masks all businesses 

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19, orders for facial coverings in businesses by employees and customers were signed by county judges of Cameron and Hidalgo counties on Wednesday. Cameron’s order will be effective on Friday, while Hidalgo County’s mandate will be implemented Wednesday. However, Hidalgo County businesses are not required to comply until Friday. The order will be active until further notice. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Petition calls for H-E-B to require facial masks

A petition out of San Antonio signed by thousands of Texas residents is calling on H-E-B supermarkets across the state to require customers to...

City removes Jefferson Davis Memorial from Washington Park

Hours afters the Brownsville City Commission voted unanimously to remove the Jefferson Davis Memorial Boulder from Washington Park city crews removed the boulder. The memorial...

Social media lends support to black-owned donut, pho businesses

Peter Jurkin’s dream to open an ice cream shop had become a reality in March with the opening of Yummy’s Ice Cream & Mini Donuts in McAllen. But as luck would have it, just one day after he opened, he had to close down because of the coronavirus. "It took me a month working on it,” Jurkin said of the repairs and other preparations he had to do before opening day. "It was just heartbreaking, I just opened and basically I had to close." Read the full story at themonitor.com