McAllen native exits troublesome past to author book

McAllen native Israel Hernandez spent his summers in elementary and junior high working in fields as a migrant farm worker. He traveled to farms across the country with his mother.  He picked all kinds of produce: strawberries, blueberries, watermelons. He remembers picking corn one day in Illinois at the age of 13, pausing and telling his mother that he wasn’t going to spend the rest of his life toiling in a field. “I told her, ‘Mom, you know what? I don’t want to do this all my life, I don’t want to do this’’ Hernandez, now 49, said. “And then she told me, ‘OK son, I know, just keep moving forward.’” Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Curriculum designers explore challenges of virtual fall semester

There are new reasons to have back-to-school jitters this year. The COVID-19 pandemic has pushed Rio Grande Valley school districts to a virtual fall semester,...

Valley Baptist offering women’s healthcare services during pandemic

HARLINGEN — While pregnancy and childbirth are most often joyous times when families prepare to welcome a new addition to the world, the recent...

Interest in homeschooling grows in distance-learning era

Families across the region are a few weeks into virtual learning, but a growing number of local parents are deciding to take matters into...

Valley Baptist participating in clinical trials that may benefit COVID-19 patients

As health officials and local hospitals continue to manage an ongoing surge of COVID-19 patients, Valley Baptist Medical Center-Harlingen is participating in a clinical...

Nonprofit continues to support students to, and through, college

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting step as it is. Now, as students also face unprecedented obstacles that the coronavirus pandemic has brought to education systems, nonprofit College Scholarship Leadership Access Program, or CSLAP, has been working to support local seniors through the process of college admissions.  Through workshops and mentorship with university students, the Rio Grande Valley-based organization works with high school juniors and seniors to  prepare them for college. Workshops cover a range of topics, including professionalism, campus policy, and budgeting.  The last several months of a school year are integral for seniors to get assistance in getting ready for university life, so CSLAP has been hosting several virtual panels to answer questions they may have. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

GALLERY: Tribute for health care workers

A caravan of local, state, and federal law enforcement flashed red and blue lights and sounded emergency sirens in a Border Patrol-led ceremony in...

Edinburg teacher to retire after 42 years with school district

Susan Smith, the Edinburg school district’s retiring audio video production teacher, remembers one student in particular during her 42 years with the district. Smith, who taught journalism for seven years before switching to audio video production, said she had the student in her first period class, that is whenever he bothered to show up. The poor kid just couldn’t wake up in time. Not a morning person herself, Smith was sympathetic. One day she had a chat with the kid. Read more at The Monitor.com.

Community Service: Brothers organize construction of laundry room

Brownsville’s unsheltered residents now have an updated and permanent space to wash laundry thanks to 18-year-old brothers and Eagle Scouts Samuel and Seth Herrera,...

New Medicare Part D model improves affordability of insulin

By Diana Ramirez, Special to the Herald Diabetes is one of the costliest health problems in America. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that health...

Driscoll Holiday Cards now on sale

Three Driscoll Children’s Hospital patients from the Rio Grande Valley are among 12 who have been chosen to design holiday cards for the 2020...

Pandemic Pregnancies: Expectant mothers learn to accommodate to COVID-19 restrictions

HARLINGEN — First time mothers usually hope to have their husbands at every doctor’s appointment and have a baby shower with every family member. But...

Sleeping during the pandemic: Advice on finding rest for the restless

As anxiety caused by the coronavirus continues to build, so have problems of restlessness for some — an often ignored problem that, in turn, can affect functionality throughout the day, a local physician explained. Dr. Adolfo Kaplan, a physician at the McAllen Pulmonary and Sleep Center of the Valley, said the importance of sleep is not addressed enough. Before the pandemic, approximately 30% of the population suffered from insomnia. Cases of chronic insomnia can lead to increased chances of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and several types of dementia. Insomnia also leads to obesity. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Valley Regional joins convalescent plasma study for COVID-19 patients

Valley Regional Medical Center has announced that it is participating in a national study to determine if plasma from convalescent, or recovered, COVID-19 patients...

Resaca de la Palma Battlefield reopens to public

Resaca de la Palma Battlefield will reopen to the public after undergoing major improvements, There is a brand-new trail and an environmentally friendly, refurbished pavilion and...

June is Men’s Health Awareness Month

With June officially serving as Men’s Health Awareness Month, there is no better time for men who normally put their own health on the...

New York filmmaker shoots documentary in Brownsville on migration issues

On a sunny day in September, the Carlotta Petrina was transformed into the set for a documentary on migration issues as crew members unloaded...

Valley Baptist works to educate community on dangers of Sepsis

HARLINGEN & BROWNSVILLE — Sepsis is a medical emergency that kills nearly 270,000 Americans each year, but unlike diseases such as cancer that have...

McAllen native part of heroic El Paso trauma center team after shooting

Ten months ago, all surgeons of the University Medical Center of El Paso received a text from the chief of surgery there: “Active shooter. Anybody available return to the hospital immediately.” Dr. Alejandro Rios Tovar, a McAllen native, who since 2011 has been an associate trauma medical director at the medical center, was one of the few who got that text on Aug. 3, 2019. Tovar had just gotten home in El Paso after a 30-hour shift as the on-call surgeon the night before. On his way home, he picked up McDonald’s — something he said he does not do often — because he “just wanted to go home and pass out, and eat whatever was on the road home.” Read the full story at themonitor.com

Mental health hotline is helping Texans navigate the pandemic

By Elvia Limón, Texas Tribune Within the first month of its launch, the state’s new mental health support line received nearly 2,000 calls from Texans...

Vela introduces resolution honoring Tejano legends

U.S. Filemon Vela, (D-Brownsville) introduced a resolution to honor and celebrate the achievements of Tejano music artists. The resolution specifically congratulates the musical contributions...

Doctors calm maternity fears amid pandemic

HARLINGEN — Once again, yes, it’s safe to go to the hospital, when you’re having a stroke, a heart attack or … a baby. Every...

CDC, health officials recommend face coverings as protection from COVID-19

As government agencies and local health departments discuss large scale measures to slow the rate of Coronavirus infections in the United States, local health...

Child vaccinations plummet: Health chief says get the kids immunized now

Cameron County children are way behind on their shots, probably because their parents are wary of going to doctors offices and clinics because of...

Far from home, UTRGV athlete recovering from surgery embraced by hospital staff

When she couldn’t be with her family, Talita Olivera De Paula adopted a new one: the staff at Edinburg Regional Medical Center. The family of the 24-year-old native of São Paulo in Brazil couldn’t be there for her college graduation or at her bedside when she was recovering from spinal surgery. That’s when the Edinburg Regional staff stepped up. “I was there without my family, and they turned into my family,” De Paula said of the nurses, physicians and physical therapist who helped her during her three-week recovery after spinal surgery at the Edinburg hospital on April 29. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

City hosts virtual medical talk

The City of Brownsville held a BTX Cares Talks Medical Edition live-streamed video on Friday where Brownsville Mayor Trey Mendez and City Commissioner Jessica...

Pre-teen unites with fellow Girl Scouts for Project Nurse Care Kit

Skyla Marroquin was so grateful for the healthcare workers who cared for her great grandmother while she fought COVID-19, that she had to do...

Local health experts urge vigilance as COVID-19 pandemic continues

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, local health officials are urging the community to continue personal safety measures as a means to combat the spread...

Maintaining good mental health key during COVID-19 situation

HARLINGEN –As health and government officials both locally and throughout the nation continue to address the situation surrounding COVID-19, health experts are reminding the...

CDC offers tips on continuing to take precautions against COVID-19

As the numbers of patients hospitalized with severe cases of COVID-19 continue to drop throughout the Rio Grande Valley, local health experts are urging...