Nonprofit continues to support students to, and through, college

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting step as it is. Now, as students also face unprecedented obstacles that the coronavirus pandemic has brought to education systems, nonprofit College Scholarship Leadership Access Program, or CSLAP, has been working to support local seniors through the process of college admissions.  Through workshops and mentorship with university students, the Rio Grande Valley-based organization works with high school juniors and seniors to  prepare them for college. Workshops cover a range of topics, including professionalism, campus policy, and budgeting.  The last several months of a school year are integral for seniors to get assistance in getting ready for university life, so CSLAP has been hosting several virtual panels to answer questions they may have. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Local students raise $100K for cancer research

In two months, nine local high school students raised a total of $122,506 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.  This year, the Rio Grande Valley’s LLS chapter hosted the organization’s campaign project, Student of the Year: a 7-week competition between high school students to raise the largest donation for the blood cancer nonprofit. This is the fifth year the nationwide organization has run the campaign, and the first year the local chapter has taken on the project.  Students were responsible for reaching out to local businesses and setting up meetings to deliver their pitches. Each candidate recruited their own team to help reach their monetary donation goal.  Read the full story at themonitor.com

Grant will allow med school Graduate Medical Education to expand

By Victoria Brito Morales, UTRGV Staff The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine Graduate Medical Education has received an $11 million grant...

Health equity is key to preventing ravaging effects of pandemics

By Lisa Mitchell-Bennett, Special to the Herald Some of the first high profile cases of COVID-19 positives included the rich and famous. Senators, professional athletes...

Money available to help conserve Monarch butterflies

The USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service will offering funding for conservation efforts that help farmers and ranchers in Texas provide food and habitat for...

Valley Baptist continues COVID-Safety standards as state reopens

Under the direction of Gov. Greg Abbott, the Governor’s Strike Force to Open Texas has started to strategically restart and revitalize all aspects of...

Valley Regional joins convalescent plasma study for COVID-19 patients

Valley Regional Medical Center has announced that it is participating in a national study to determine if plasma from convalescent, or recovered, COVID-19 patients...

Patient experience for new moms key to Valley Baptist-Brownsville upgrades

While giving birth to a healthy baby is usually the top priority for moms-to-be, both ambiance and comfort often play large roles in a...

Rolling Tribute: Law enforcement show appreciation to health care workers

A caravan of local, state, and federal law enforcement flashed red and blue lights and sounded emergency sirens in a Border Patrol-led ceremony in...

Childbirth in the time of coronavirus

Before the coronavirus pandemic, Karin Hall, a nurse, enjoyed roaming around her prepared childbirth classes at Edinburg Regional Medical Center, teaching expecting partners various birthing exercises and massages. Now she's unable to walk around those classrooms, unable to work with those expecting parents in person. Hall taught her first online class in March, where several expecting partners connected with her through Zoom, a video conferencing app. The registered nurse says hosting childbirth preparedness classes has never been more important. Giving birth to a child is stressful for many couples, and doing so in the midst of a pandemic only adds to that anxiety. Read the full story at themonitor.com