Childbirth in the time of coronavirus

Before the coronavirus pandemic, Karin Hall, a nurse, enjoyed roaming around her prepared childbirth classes at Edinburg Regional Medical Center, teaching expecting partners various birthing exercises and massages. Now she's unable to walk around those classrooms, unable to work with those expecting parents in person. Hall taught her first online class in March, where several expecting partners connected with her through Zoom, a video conferencing app. The registered nurse says hosting childbirth preparedness classes has never been more important. Giving birth to a child is stressful for many couples, and doing so in the midst of a pandemic only adds to that anxiety. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Local businesses prepare to open, experts stress need for COVID-19 protections

As some local businesses prepare to reopen May 1, local health officials continue to urge caution and encourage the community to remain vigilant against...

Valley Baptist continues COVID-Safety standards as state reopens

Under the direction of Gov. Greg Abbott, the Governor’s Strike Force to Open Texas has started to strategically restart and revitalize all aspects of...

Local students raise $100K for cancer research

In two months, nine local high school students raised a total of $122,506 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.  This year, the Rio Grande Valley’s LLS chapter hosted the organization’s campaign project, Student of the Year: a 7-week competition between high school students to raise the largest donation for the blood cancer nonprofit. This is the fifth year the nationwide organization has run the campaign, and the first year the local chapter has taken on the project.  Students were responsible for reaching out to local businesses and setting up meetings to deliver their pitches. Each candidate recruited their own team to help reach their monetary donation goal.  Read the full story at themonitor.com

Sister strives to honor brother’s legacy through faith and dreams

BY A. COLLEEN DeGUZMAN, STAFF WRITER Next year, Shantel Garza will be the age her older brother was when he died after not receiving a heart...

Health equity is key to preventing ravaging effects of pandemics

By Lisa Mitchell-Bennett, Special to the Herald Some of the first high profile cases of COVID-19 positives included the rich and famous. Senators, professional athletes...

What to stream: Taking a look at nonfiction offerings

By Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service It’s coming up on eight weeks of a nationwide coronavirus shutdown, and while, thanks to the era of peak TV...

Rolling Tribute: Law enforcement show appreciation to health care workers

A caravan of local, state, and federal law enforcement flashed red and blue lights and sounded emergency sirens in a Border Patrol-led ceremony in...

Quarantine cooking with your kids?

BY SHARYN JACKSON, STAR TRIBUNE MINNEAPOLIS — My 2-year-old, Milo, has recently begun stringing short sentences together, and my favorite of his newfound phrases is...

First baby of 1998 an Aggie grad

The first baby born in Brownsville in 1998 is now a college graduate.  Valeria Ramos’ father proudly graduated from Texas A&M University College Station in Lubbock in 1985, then her older sister went on to be an Aggie also, graduating in 2016. So, it was not a surprise that Valeria sought Aggieland.  In fact, when Valeria was featured on The Brownsville Herald’s front page on Jan. 2, 1998, J. Noel Espinoza wrote: “Brownsville’s first baby of 1998 may grow up to be a Texas A&M Aggie.” Read the full story at themonitor.com.