Childbirth in the time of coronavirus

Before the coronavirus pandemic, Karin Hall, a nurse, enjoyed roaming around her prepared childbirth classes at Edinburg Regional Medical Center, teaching expecting partners various birthing exercises and massages. Now she's unable to walk around those classrooms, unable to work with those expecting parents in person. Hall taught her first online class in March, where several expecting partners connected with her through Zoom, a video conferencing app. The registered nurse says hosting childbirth preparedness classes has never been more important. Giving birth to a child is stressful for many couples, and doing so in the midst of a pandemic only adds to that anxiety. Read the full story at themonitor.com

McAllen High grad’s first film gets private Edinburg premiere 

Writer, director and composer Jack Danini turned his deep admiration for New York City and the lessons he learned about falling in love and...

Dentists charging extra for infection control

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News After nearly two months at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Erica Schoenradt was making plans in May to...

Edinburg teacher to retire after 42 years with school district

Susan Smith, the Edinburg school district’s retiring audio video production teacher, remembers one student in particular during her 42 years with the district. Smith, who taught journalism for seven years before switching to audio video production, said she had the student in her first period class, that is whenever he bothered to show up. The poor kid just couldn’t wake up in time. Not a morning person herself, Smith was sympathetic. One day she had a chat with the kid. Read more at The Monitor.com.

Coalition guiding teens through the pandemic

Teenagers may be aware of the safety measures to follow during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they don’t always know how to deal with the isolation. One of the most difficult things about this pandemic for 14-year-old Jennifer Cruz, a member of the UNITED Youth Group, is not being able to see her nephew due to safety guidelines. The UNITED group is part of the Uniting Neighbors in Drug Abuse Defense (UNIDAD) coalition, a program from Behavioral Health Solutions of South Texas which serves in Hidalgo County and focuses on topics such as underage drinking, binge drinking, marijuana and synthetics, and prescription medication misuse, according to its website. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Local horror author sets book in Weslaco

Richard Charles wanted to give something back to his hometown Weslaco, and he knows of no better gift than a good, chilling revenge story. Charles...

Healthiest city again: Harlingen, Los Fresnos win challenge

HARLINGEN — Once again, the Valley is being awarded for being healthy. The City of McAllen, the City of Harlingen, and Los Fresnos were all...

Boy Scouts to hold annual fundraiser virtually

The Rio Grande Council of the Boy Scouts of America will be holding a fundraising event next week to help support the local scouting...

Rolling Tribute: Law enforcement show appreciation to health care workers

A caravan of local, state, and federal law enforcement flashed red and blue lights and sounded emergency sirens in a Border Patrol-led ceremony in...

Police officers share breast cancer awareness

HARLINGEN — The beginning of October brings more than fall leaves and pumpkin patches. It is an opportunity to pay homage to breast cancer...

Local students raise $100K for cancer research

In two months, nine local high school students raised a total of $122,506 for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.  This year, the Rio Grande Valley’s LLS chapter hosted the organization’s campaign project, Student of the Year: a 7-week competition between high school students to raise the largest donation for the blood cancer nonprofit. This is the fifth year the nationwide organization has run the campaign, and the first year the local chapter has taken on the project.  Students were responsible for reaching out to local businesses and setting up meetings to deliver their pitches. Each candidate recruited their own team to help reach their monetary donation goal.  Read the full story at themonitor.com

Rosario Guillen pushes to fulfill dance dreams

Pharr native Rosario Guillen may sometimes wake up with a body so sore it’s hard to get out of bed. For him, that’s the...

Valley Baptist offering women’s healthcare services during pandemic

HARLINGEN — While pregnancy and childbirth are most often joyous times when families prepare to welcome a new addition to the world, the recent...

Artist paints, donates part to Feeding America

Bartosz Beda, an artist who has exhibited at the Brownsville Museum of Fine Art, created a project where he creates one painting every day...

Ride to end polio: Rotary ‘Moto’ raises funds in South Texas

By Denise Cathey, Photojournalist As the convoy of motorcyclists approaches the Sunrise Mall, members of the Rotary Club of Brownsville Sunrise Club cheer and wave...

Valley Baptist participating in clinical trials that may benefit COVID-19 patients

As health officials and local hospitals continue to manage an ongoing surge of COVID-19 patients, Valley Baptist Medical Center-Harlingen is participating in a clinical...

Trio of RGV natives compete in ‘American Ninja Warrior’ on NBC

There are two new ninja warriors in town. Valley natives Holly Cavazos and Gloria Orta were first-time contestants on NBC’s latest season of “American Ninja...

GALLERY: Tribute for health care workers

A caravan of local, state, and federal law enforcement flashed red and blue lights and sounded emergency sirens in a Border Patrol-led ceremony in...

Tales of Bravery: Breast cancer survivors share experiences

HARLINGEN — Elizabeth Martinez-Gonzalez was first diagnosed with breast cancer at age 32. Martinez-Gonzalez, 51, said the moment she was told she had cancer, she...

What to stream: Taking a look at nonfiction offerings

By Katie Walsh, Tribune News Service It’s coming up on eight weeks of a nationwide coronavirus shutdown, and while, thanks to the era of peak TV...

Historic Ghosts: Association to host ghost-themed tours

Like every year during Halloween season, the Brownsville Historical Association invites the community to participate in their Haunted History and Murder Mystery Mayhem tours...

New Medicare Part D model improves affordability of insulin

By Diana Ramirez, Special to the Herald Diabetes is one of the costliest health problems in America. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that health...

Barbacoa’s History: Local chef takes a walk down memory lane

If you’ve lived in the Rio Grande Valley area for years, you may know the drill of waking up every Sunday early in the...

Southern Careers Institute hosts free movie night

Southern Careers Institute’s Brownsville campus is hosting a free drive-in movie night and non-perishable food drive on Thursday, Oct. 29 at 8 p.m. The Halloween-themed...

Pandemic Pregnancies: Expectant mothers learn to accommodate to COVID-19 restrictions

HARLINGEN — First time mothers usually hope to have their husbands at every doctor’s appointment and have a baby shower with every family member. But...

Edinburg CISD repurposes buses, drivers to deliver meals, school supplies 

EDINBURG — The last time Juan Heredia drove a school bus full of students, it was March. Since the pandemic hit, the school bus driver...

Valley Regional joins convalescent plasma study for COVID-19 patients

Valley Regional Medical Center has announced that it is participating in a national study to determine if plasma from convalescent, or recovered, COVID-19 patients...

Valley Baptist highlights importance of mammograms

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Valley Baptist Health System is raising awareness throughout the Rio Grande Valley community about prevention and treatment. In...

First baby of 1998 an Aggie grad

The first baby born in Brownsville in 1998 is now a college graduate.  Valeria Ramos’ father proudly graduated from Texas A&M University College Station in Lubbock in 1985, then her older sister went on to be an Aggie also, graduating in 2016. So, it was not a surprise that Valeria sought Aggieland.  In fact, when Valeria was featured on The Brownsville Herald’s front page on Jan. 2, 1998, J. Noel Espinoza wrote: “Brownsville’s first baby of 1998 may grow up to be a Texas A&M Aggie.” Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Blessed beyond belief: Mother and son to have joint exhibit at Fine Art Museum

Hand-painted chairs, colorful portraits and religious landscapes, are all part of the new exhibit by  local artists Rosie Cantu and Andrew Garcia, who are mother...