Artist paints, donates part to Feeding America

Bartosz Beda, an artist who has exhibited at the Brownsville Museum of Fine Art, created a project where he creates one painting every day...

Healthiest city again: Harlingen, Los Fresnos win challenge

HARLINGEN — Once again, the Valley is being awarded for being healthy. The City of McAllen, the City of Harlingen, and Los Fresnos were all...

Healthiest city again: Harlingen, Los Fresnos win challenge

HARLINGEN — Once again, the Valley is being awarded for being healthy. The City of McAllen, the City of Harlingen, and Los Fresnos were all...

Mental health frontlines; Health workers see rise in patient anxiety

For nearly five months, Rio Grande Valley residents have been working hard to maintain jobs, families, and health while COVID-19 infections and the necessary...

Coalition guiding teens through the pandemic

Teenagers may be aware of the safety measures to follow during the COVID-19 pandemic, but they don’t always know how to deal with the isolation. One of the most difficult things about this pandemic for 14-year-old Jennifer Cruz, a member of the UNITED Youth Group, is not being able to see her nephew due to safety guidelines. The UNITED group is part of the Uniting Neighbors in Drug Abuse Defense (UNIDAD) coalition, a program from Behavioral Health Solutions of South Texas which serves in Hidalgo County and focuses on topics such as underage drinking, binge drinking, marijuana and synthetics, and prescription medication misuse, according to its website. Read the full story at themonitor.com

VRMC names new chief operating officer

Valley Regional Medical Center on Friday named Lauren Davis as the hospital’s chief operating officer and said she will assume her new role today. “Lauren’s...

Valley Baptist urging recovered COVID-19 patients to take part in plasma programs

As local hospitals continue to manage an ongoing surge of COVID-19 patients, area physicians are urging those who have recovered from COVID-19 infection to...

South Texas ISD teacher wins recognition from state

OLMITO — The best way to understand history is to become a part of it. Elizabeth Carr has spent long hours emphasizing that point to...

Health officials warn of pandemic’s mental toll

EDINBURG — As the pandemic prepares to stretch into its fifth month and cases of COVID-19 continue to be reported at record highs, local...

Local health experts urge vigilance as COVID-19 pandemic continues

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, local health officials are urging the community to continue personal safety measures as a means to combat the spread...

Doctors calm maternity fears amid pandemic

HARLINGEN — Once again, yes, it’s safe to go to the hospital, when you’re having a stroke, a heart attack or … a baby. Every...

New Medicare Part D model improves affordability of insulin

By Diana Ramirez, Special to the Herald Diabetes is one of the costliest health problems in America. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that health...

June is Men’s Health Awareness Month

With June officially serving as Men’s Health Awareness Month, there is no better time for men who normally put their own health on the...

McAllen native named San Antonio Artist of the Year

Ansen Seale’s passion for photography sparked when his mother let him transform their home’s guest bathroom into a darkroom to develop his pictures.  He was a McAllen High School student then, and often used the critters he found in his backyard — lizards, palm trees, frogs or birds — as his subjects. Now 59 and living in San Antonio, Seale’s camerawork has captured many parts of the world, including Rome, Berlin, London and Naples. It has even earned him several accolades, the most recent being named the 2020 San Antonio Artist of the Year by the San Antonio Art League and Museum.  Read the full story at themonitor.com

Dentists charging extra for infection control

By Phil Galewitz, Kaiser Health News After nearly two months at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Erica Schoenradt was making plans in May to...

Far from home, UTRGV athlete recovering from surgery embraced by hospital staff

When she couldn’t be with her family, Talita Olivera De Paula adopted a new one: the staff at Edinburg Regional Medical Center. The family of the 24-year-old native of São Paulo in Brazil couldn’t be there for her college graduation or at her bedside when she was recovering from spinal surgery. That’s when the Edinburg Regional staff stepped up. “I was there without my family, and they turned into my family,” De Paula said of the nurses, physicians and physical therapist who helped her during her three-week recovery after spinal surgery at the Edinburg hospital on April 29. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Valley Baptist offering women’s healthcare services during pandemic

HARLINGEN — While pregnancy and childbirth are most often joyous times when families prepare to welcome a new addition to the world, the recent...

McAllen native part of heroic El Paso trauma center team after shooting

Ten months ago, all surgeons of the University Medical Center of El Paso received a text from the chief of surgery there: “Active shooter. Anybody available return to the hospital immediately.” Dr. Alejandro Rios Tovar, a McAllen native, who since 2011 has been an associate trauma medical director at the medical center, was one of the few who got that text on Aug. 3, 2019. Tovar had just gotten home in El Paso after a 30-hour shift as the on-call surgeon the night before. On his way home, he picked up McDonald’s — something he said he does not do often — because he “just wanted to go home and pass out, and eat whatever was on the road home.” Read the full story at themonitor.com

Sleeping during the pandemic: Advice on finding rest for the restless

As anxiety caused by the coronavirus continues to build, so have problems of restlessness for some — an often ignored problem that, in turn, can affect functionality throughout the day, a local physician explained. Dr. Adolfo Kaplan, a physician at the McAllen Pulmonary and Sleep Center of the Valley, said the importance of sleep is not addressed enough. Before the pandemic, approximately 30% of the population suffered from insomnia. Cases of chronic insomnia can lead to increased chances of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and several types of dementia. Insomnia also leads to obesity. Read the full story at themonitor.com

Valley Baptist continues COVID-Safety standards as state reopens

Under the direction of Gov. Greg Abbott, the Governor’s Strike Force to Open Texas has started to strategically restart and revitalize all aspects of...

Nonprofit continues to support students to, and through, college

The transition from high school to college can be a daunting step as it is. Now, as students also face unprecedented obstacles that the coronavirus pandemic has brought to education systems, nonprofit College Scholarship Leadership Access Program, or CSLAP, has been working to support local seniors through the process of college admissions.  Through workshops and mentorship with university students, the Rio Grande Valley-based organization works with high school juniors and seniors to  prepare them for college. Workshops cover a range of topics, including professionalism, campus policy, and budgeting.  The last several months of a school year are integral for seniors to get assistance in getting ready for university life, so CSLAP has been hosting several virtual panels to answer questions they may have. Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Valley Baptist resumes elective procedures

HARLINGEN — You can get that skin growth biopsied. You can get that hernia repaired. You can find out the cause of those abdominal...

IDEA Quest teacher holds off on grad school plans to see students through to...

He put his own educational endeavors on hold because he wanted to see his first class of students walk the stage. Though it won’t be something he will get to be able to actually see happen anymore, Alejandro Madrigal said he would not have changed a thing — the bonds he forged with his students were more than he could have asked for. The Weslaco native graduated from the University of Texas in Austin before taking his first step in the education field as an eighth grade U.S. history teacher at IDEA Quest College Preparatory in 2015 through Teach for America. The organization places teachers in schools across the country for two years, and Madrigal was placed back in the Rio Grande Valley to teach for a couple of years before going to graduate school — at least, that was the plan. “I think other teachers could attest to this too, there is something special about the first group you teach,” Madrigal, 26, said. “So, I had to see them go all the way through, there was almost no doubt that I had to stay until I saw that happen… it was OK that my plans were put on hold for just a few years.” Read the full story at themonitor.com

Edinburg teacher to retire after 42 years with school district

Susan Smith, the Edinburg school district’s retiring audio video production teacher, remembers one student in particular during her 42 years with the district. Smith, who taught journalism for seven years before switching to audio video production, said she had the student in her first period class, that is whenever he bothered to show up. The poor kid just couldn’t wake up in time. Not a morning person herself, Smith was sympathetic. One day she had a chat with the kid. Read more at The Monitor.com.

Valley Baptist recognizes area EMS staff during National Emergency Medical Services Week

As May 17-23 has been designated as National Emergency Medical Services Week, Valley Baptist Health System would like to recognize the men and women...

Quarantine cooking with your kids?

BY SHARYN JACKSON, STAR TRIBUNE MINNEAPOLIS — My 2-year-old, Milo, has recently begun stringing short sentences together, and my favorite of his newfound phrases is...

First baby of 1998 an Aggie grad

The first baby born in Brownsville in 1998 is now a college graduate.  Valeria Ramos’ father proudly graduated from Texas A&M University College Station in Lubbock in 1985, then her older sister went on to be an Aggie also, graduating in 2016. So, it was not a surprise that Valeria sought Aggieland.  In fact, when Valeria was featured on The Brownsville Herald’s front page on Jan. 2, 1998, J. Noel Espinoza wrote: “Brownsville’s first baby of 1998 may grow up to be a Texas A&M Aggie.” Read the full story at themonitor.com.

Grant will allow med school Graduate Medical Education to expand

By Victoria Brito Morales, UTRGV Staff The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine Graduate Medical Education has received an $11 million grant...

Mental health hotline is helping Texans navigate the pandemic

By Elvia Limón, Texas Tribune Within the first month of its launch, the state’s new mental health support line received nearly 2,000 calls from Texans...

Local Heroes: Medical workers share what it’s like to be a mother during COVID-19

Mother’s Day this year will be nothing like the ones we have experienced in our lifetime. With most restaurants closed and the community practicing...